Fly Fishing in Patagonia: A Trout Bum’s Guide to Argentina

Although Patagonia is becoming an increasingly popular world destination for fly-fishermen, there is a conspicuous lack of information available to anglers on this remote area. Until now.

Barrett Mattison and Evan Jones have spent several seasons independently fishing and exploring the entirety of Argentine Patagonia (an area roughly the size of Montana and California combined), and in this book they share everything you need to know before embarking on the adventure of a lifetime.

Fly-Fishing in Patagonia includes: a general overview, a brief history of fishing in Patagonia, a breakdown of each fishing region, an in-depth description of over 100 waterways, best seasons to fish, logistics for travel, outstanding photographs and much more. If you have always dreamed of fishing Patagonia but weren’t sure where to start, you now have all the information you need to have a safe and successful trip.

Hardcover. 233 pages. Frank Amato Publications LLC

Reviews

“If you are thinking about a fly-fishing trip to Argentina, then this book is a must! I was able to use this awesome, detailed guidebook to plan a 10-day trip to northern Patagonia for my dad and myself without any reliance on a lodge or outfitter. We fished the area around Junin de los Andes, and with the help of this super-informative book we had very good luck, catching both numbers and size, all without a guide except a couple of floats down the Chimehuin. With such detailed information and great color photos, I would highly recommend this book to any fly-fisherman.”David Miller
“Be careful! If you read this book you’ll begin trying to figure out how to take a leave of absence from work before you even finish the book. Patagonia is beautiful and the fish are amazing. If you are lucky enough to really plan a trip to see it for yourself, this book is an invaluable resource.”
Howard Roark
“We are currently using this book as we fly fish in Patagonia, and it has great tips. It has saved us so much money in guide fees because we can do so much more fishing on our own with the information provided in this book. We especially like the “logistics” section given with each river, including places to camp, etc. It has great info for the self-guiding types, but also would be useful for those using guides because it gives information on the best guides in each area. So much information in just 233 pages!”Esma Holley
“I just returned from a month in Patagonia (February, 2010) and this book is an absolute must have. Information down there is unbelievably sparse and this book will be your go-to as you try to figure out where to fish, how to get there, and what to use. I followed the detailed information to rivers that I would have never gone to without it and it helped me make contacts to find out the most current information. Pick up a copy before your trip!”A. Bouldin
“At last a current review for the independent flyfisher. From my knowledge of Patagonia it is both accurate and useful.”William Langley
“I worked as a fly-fishing guide in Chile for many years, and in my free time made several fishing forays into Argentina. I highly recommend this guidebook, and I wish it had been available when I was traveling there. This book is indispensible for an independent traveling fisherman, but even travelers who work with outfitters and guides and who stay for shorter periods will find it enjoyable and informative.

Since 1991, “the” guidebook for fly fishing in Argentina has been William C. Leitch’s venerable “Argentine Trout Fishing; A Fly Fisherman’s Guide to Patagonia”. That book is now out of print, and Mattison and Jones’s guide is an admirable update; in my opinion theirs is a superior effort – not only is the information more current, but their book is more comprehensive and detailed than Leitch’s.

Mattison and Jones cover the trout waters from central Neuquen province (Alumine) all the way south to Tierra del Fuego. The first 40 pages are dedicated to an overview of what to expect while traveling in Argentine Patagonia, with a special emphasis on logistics and planning from the perspective of a visiting angler. The rest of the book provides a survey of the most notable trout angling in this enormous region of South America. Prominent rivers, lakes, and some small streams – especially productive spring creeks – are all covered. A description of each body of water is provided, followed by a section on logistics, with useful data on road names, access points, and camping spots. The book is peppered with nice photos of Patagonia scenery, along with plenty of pictures of big trout.

What is especially impressive about this guidebook is the information on the waters in some of the most remote sections of Patagonia, especially in Santa Cruz province. This is serious outback country, raw and often very harsh, and anyone who explores this region will need to budget lots of time and be entirely self-sufficient. To my knowledge, Mattison and Jones are the only persons who have ever described in depth (and in English) the fishing in this part of the world. They rightfully caution, however, that “remote” doesn’t necessarily translate into outstanding fishing, and while they provide reports on places with good angling, they also help travelers by describing the other waters – often sterile and glacial – that offer little in the way of angling potential.

This book is best used in conjunction with good maps, especially maps that show even small gravel roads. Many of the logistical questions and fishing access points described in the book involve such roads. If I might offer one bit of constructive criticism it would be just that: the book would be more effective if it contained more maps, especially some drawings done in a large scale (the book does contain some regional maps that indicate the general locations of listed waters).

But even without detailed maps, the book is extremely useful; it provides directions that are straightforward, and descriptions that are spot-on. I’m happy to note that I paid particular attention to the book’s information on waters that I’m very familiar with, and in doing so, I never encountered a single error in any of the narrative. These guys clearly know their stuff and write about it accurately.

Very often, I am asked to help fishermen plan an upcoming trip to Argentina, and over the years I’ve refined a list of suggestions and bits of advice that have helped many people. From now on, obtaining a copy of this book will be added to my pre-trip recommendations to all anglers bound for Argentina.

I offer my congratulations to the authors for a job well done”
Woodstock